Title Beyond the Gap (Sustainable Infrastructure Series)
Subtitle How Countries Can Afford the Infrastructure They Need while Protecting the Planet
Author Julie Rozenberg, Marianne Fay
ISBN 9781464813634
List price USD 39.95
Price outside India Available on Request
Original price
Binding Paperback
No of pages 200
Book size 178 x 254 mm
Publishing year 2019
Original publisher The World Bank
Published in India by .
Exclusive distributors Viva Books Private Limited
Sales territory India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, .
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Description:

Beyond the Gap: How Countries Can Afford the Infrastructure They Need while Protecting the Planet aims to shift the debate regarding investment needs away from a simple focus on spending more and toward a focus on spending better on the right objectives, using relevant metrics. It does so by offering a careful and systematic approach to estimating the funding needs to close the service gaps in water and sanitation, transportation, electricity, irrigation, and Hood protection. Exploring thousands of scenarios, this report finds that funding needs depend on the service goals and policy choices of low- and middle-income countries and could range anywhere from 2 percent to 8 percent of GDP per year by 2030.

Beyond the Gap also identifies a policy mix that will enable countries to achieve key international goals—universal access to water, sanitation, and electricity; greater mobility; improved food security; better protection from floods; and eventual full decarbonization—while limiting spending on new infrastructure to 4.5 percent of GDP per year. Importantly, the exploration of thousands of scenarios shows that infrastructure investment paths compatible with full decarbonization in the second half of the century need not cost more than more-polluting alternatives. Investment needs remain at 2 percent to 8 percent of GDP even when only the decarbonized scenarios are examined. The actual amount depends on the quality and quantity of services targeted, the timing of investments, construction costs, and complementary policies.

Finally, investing in infrastructure is not enough; maintaining it also matters. Improving services requires much more than capital expenditure. Ensuring a steady How of resources for operations and maintenance is a necessary condition for success. Good maintenance also generates substantial savings by reducing the total life-cycle cost of transport and water and sanitation infrastructure by more than 50 percent.


Contents:

Acknowledgments

Key Messages

About the Contributors

Abbreviations

Overview (Marianne Fay and Julie Rozenberg) • Key Messages • Introduction • How Much New Infrastructure Is Needed? • Scenario Approaches Allow for Informed Policy Making • Operations and Maintenance Play a Major Role in Costs • In Sum • Notes • References

Chapter 1: Making Infrastructure Needs Assessments Useful and Relevant (Marianne Fay and Julie Rozenberg) • Key Messages • Introduction • Why Is Estimating Infrastructure Needs So Difficult? • A Framework to Make Infrastructure Investment Needs Assessments Useful • In Sum • Notes • References

Chapter 2: Water, Sanitation, and Irrigation (Charles J. E. Fox, Blanca Lopez-Alascio, Marianne Fay, Claire Nicolas, and Julie Rozenberg) • Key Messages • Introduction • Water and Sanitation: MDG or SDG Makes All the Difference • Irrigation: A Question of How Much to Expand • In Sum • Notes • References

Chapter 3: Power (Claire Nicolas, Julie Rozenberg, and Marianne Fay) • Key Messages • Introduction • Universal Access Costs Are Driven by Policy Choices regarding the Strategy to Increase Access • Factoring Climate Change into Investment Needs Estimates • South America: Bringing Climate and Demand Constraints Together • In Sum • Notes • References

Chapter 4: Transport (Julie Rozenberg and Marianne Fay) • Key Messages • Introduction • Rural Accessibility. • Urban Transport • Global Transport Needs • In Sum • Annex 4A: Transport Investment Can Have Positive Impacts on Welfare but Hide Negative Impacts for Some Actors and for the Environment • Notes • References

Chapter 5: Flood Protection (Julie Rozenberg and Marianne Fay) • Key Messages • Introduction • Costing Coastal and River Flood Protection Strategies • Future Investment Costs Depend on Construction Costs and Risk Aversion • How Different Regions Fare Depends on the Protection Strategy • Protection Strategies Should Budget for Long-Term Maintenance Expenses • In Sum • Notes • References

Chapter 6: Infrastructure and Disruptive Technologies (Michael M. Leifman, Marianne Fay, Claire Nicolas, and Julie Rozenberg) • Key Messages • Introduction • New Technologies Are Enabling Disruptions and Transformations • New Technologies Could Give Rise to Very Different Futures • What Governments Can Do (and Avoid Doing) • In Sum • Annex 6A: Methodology to Derive the Three Scenarios • Note • References

Technical Appendix


About the Editors:

Julie Rozenberg is a Senior Economist in the Office of Chief Economist of the Sustainable Development Vice Presidency at the World Bank. Her work includes green growth and climate change mitigation strategies and climate change adaptation and disaster risk management. She is the author of many research articles and participated in the writing of several World Bank flagship reports, including Decarbonizing Development: Three Steps to a Zero-Carbon Future and Shock Waves: Managing the Impacts of Climate Change on Poverty. She also develops innovative methodologies to take long-term uncertainties into account in the economic analyses of projects in sectors like transport, water, or urbanization, helping World Bank clients to deal with climate change constraints and other long-term uncertainties in the preparation of projects and strategies. She holds an engineering degree from École Nationale Supérieure de Techniques Avancées and a PhD in economics from École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales in Paris.

Marianne Fay is the Chief Economist of the Sustainable Development Vice Presidency at the World Bank. She previously served as the Chief Economist for Climate Change. She has contributed to several World Development Reports, notably World Development Report 2010: Development and Climate Change, which she codirected, and has led various recent World Bank reports, such as Inclusive Green Growth: The Pathway to Sustainable Development and Decarbonizing Development: Three Steps to a Zero-Carbon Future. She has held positions in different Regions of the World Bank (Africa, Europe and Central Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean), working on infrastructure, urbanization, and climate change. She is the author of articles and books on these topics. She is a founding member of the Green Growth Knowledge Platform, and she holds a PhD in economics from Columbia University.


Target Audience:

This book will be useful to Infrastructure and Sustainable development.

 
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