Title Paths between Peace and Public Service
Subtitle A Comparative Analysis of Public Service Reform Trajectories in Postconflict Countries
Author Jürgen René Blum, Marcos Ferreiro-Rodriguez, Vivek Srivastava
ISBN 9781464810824
List price USD 49.95
Price outside India Available on Request
Original price
Binding Paperback
No of pages 446
Book size 178 x 254 mm
Publishing year 2019
Original publisher The World Bank
Published in India by .
Exclusive distributors Viva Books Private Limited
Sales territory India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, .
Status
About the book Send Enquiry
  
 

Reviews:

“ Rebuilding the bureaucracy is possibly the most underappreciated policy and research question in fragile states today. This is one of the most politically astute and thoughtful books I’ve read on postconflict policy making of any kind.”

—Christopher Blattman, Ramalee E. Pearson Professor of Global Conflict Studies, Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts, Harris Public Policy, University of Chicago

“ Rebuilding states after conflict is the greatest challenge in development today. And yet we know precious little about the actual experience of countries that have tried to rebuild their civil service and restore public services. This is a monumental study based on extensive empirical data and field-based research across multiple cases that actually opens up the black box of state building in conflict-affected countries. It should be required reading for anyone who takes on this extraordinary challenge.”

—Joel S. Hellman, Dean, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University

“ There isn’t a more pressing problem in international development than formulating practical strategies for building institutions in fragile states. This book is a remarkable distillation of the frontline experiences of the World Bank in tackling this task. Finally, we have the basis for an empirically grounded assessment of what works and why. Unputdownable.”

—James Robinson, Reverend Dr. Richard L. Pearson Professor of Global Conflict and University Professor; Institute Director, Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts, Harris Public Policy, University of Chicago


Description:

Building a capable public service is fundamental to postconflict state building. Yet in postconflict settings, short-term pressures are often at odds with this longer-term objective. To ensure peace and stabilize fragile coalitions, the imperative for political elites to hand out public jobs and better pay to constituents dominates merit. Donor-financed projects that rely on technical assistants and parallel structures, rather than on government systems, are often the primary vehicle for meeting pressing service delivery needs. What, then, is a workable approach to rebuilding public services postconflict?

Paths between Peace and Public Service seeks to answer this question by comparing public service reform trajectories in five countries—Afghanistan, Liberia, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, and Timor-Leste—in the aftermath of conflict. The study seeks to explain these countries’ different trajectories through process tracing and structured, focused methods of comparative analysis. To reconstruct reform trajectories, the report draws on more than 200 interviews conducted with government officials and other stakeholders, as well as administrative data. The study analyzes how reform trajectories are influenced by elite bargains and highlights their path dependency, shaped by preconflict legacies and the specifics of the conflict period. As the first systematic study on postconflict public service reforms, it identifies lessons for the future engagement of development partners in building public services.


Contents:

Foreword

Acknowledgments

About the Authors

Executive Summary

Abbreviations

Introduction • Objectives • Research Design and Limitations • Structure • Notes • Bibliography

Chapter 1: Analytical Framework • Two Different Examples: Public Service Commissions • The Analytical Framework • Notes • Bibliography

Chapter 2: Public Service Size and Composition • Introduction • What Is the Public Service? • Legacies, Paths, and Results • Choices and Consequences • Conclusion • Notes • Bibliography

Chapter 3: Pay • Introduction • What Is Pay Reform? • Legacies, Paths, and Results • Choices and Consequences • Conclusion: Pay Strategies • Notes • Bibliography

Chapter 4: Public Service Management Bodies • Introduction • Overview: Central Bodies in the Five Case Study Countries • Wage Bill and Payroll Control • Merit Protection • Administrative Reform • Conclusion • Notes • Bibliography

Chapter 5: Parallel Structures • Introduction • What Are Parallel Structures? • Country-Level Aid Architecture and Fund-Flow Choices • Project-Level Parallel Structure Design Choices • Conclusions • Notes • Bibliography

Appendix A: Afghanistan Case Study • Overview • Public Service Size and Structure • Pay • Public Service Management Bodies • Parallel Structures • Notes • Bibliography

Appendix B: Liberia Case Study • Overview • Sociopolitical and Historical Contexts • Public Service Size and Structure • Pay • Public Service Management Bodies • Parallel Structures • Notes • Bibliography

Appendix C: Sierra Leone Case Study • Overview • Sociopolitical and Historical Contexts • Public Service Size and Structure • Pay • Public Service Management Bodies • Parallel Structures • Notes • Bibliography

Appendix D: South Sudan Case Study • Overview • Sociopolitical and Historical Contexts • Public Service Size and Structure • Pay • Public Service Management Bodies • Parallel Structures • Notes • Bibliography

Appendix E: Timor-Leste Case Study • Overview • Sociopolitical and Historical Contexts • Public Service Size and Structure • Pay • Public Service Management Bodies • Parallel Structures • Notes • Bibliography


About the Authors:

Jürgen René Blum (jblum@worldbank.org) is a senior public sector specialist at the World Bank. His recent work focuses on the governance-growth nexus in East Asian countries, especially China. He contributed to World Development Report 2017: Governance and the Law and has worked on the political economy of public management reform in Africa and East Asia. His past work focused on public employment and institutional reform, especially in fragile countries. He cofounded the World Bank’s impact evaluation initiative on governance (ieGovern), with a focus on public procurement reform. Before joining the World Bank, he worked at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on a policy dialogue between Arab and OECD countries on public management reform. He holds a master’s degree in public policy from the Harvard University Kennedy School and a diploma in international studies of economics, politics, and languages from Passau University.

Marcos Ferreiro-Rodríguez is an aeronautical engineer, humanitarian practitioner, and researcher. He is also a Harvard graduate and a Barrié de la Maza fellow. He started his professional path in 1999, in the aerospace sector, in Spain and France. In 2004 he gave his career a shift and joined the humanitarian agency Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF; Doctors Without Borders), working in several humanitarian crises around the globe. In 2009 he returned to the academic world to pursue studies in public administration in international development. He has since worked for the World Bank and several nongovernmental organizations in research and management roles. He has extensive field experience in conflict-affected countries, including the Democratic Republic of Congo, Liberia, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, and Timor-Leste, as well as in other low- and middle-income countries, such as Brazil, Ecuador, Haiti, India, Kenya, and Mauritania.

Vivek Srivastava is a lead public sector specialist in the public sector management practice at the World Bank. He is an economist and has worked on public management and employment and institutional reforms, decentralization, and service delivery in a number of countries in Africa, South Asia, and the Pacific Islands and has a special interest in postconflict countries and the political economy of reforms. He is currently seconded to the Water Global Practice, where he is working on governance and WASH (water, sanitation, and hygiene) services. Before joining the World Bank, he was a civil servant with the Indian Administrative Service for more than 20 years. He holds a doctorate in economics from Boston University.


Target Audience:

This book will be useful to people interested in Public Sector Management.

 
Special prices are applicable to the authorised sales territory only.
Prices are subject to change without prior notice.