Title An Introduction to Moral Philosophy
Subtitle
Author Jonathan Wolff
ISBN 9780393644081
List price GBP 37.50
Price outside India Available on Request
Original price
Binding Paperback
No of pages 304
Book size 140 x 210 mm
Publishing year 2017
Original publisher W. W. Norton & Company
Published in India by .
Exclusive distributors Viva Books Private Limited
Sales territory India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, .
Status New Arrival
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Description:

Learn the story behind the data about today’s families

Assigned at over 300 schools, The Family was an instant success due to Philip Cohen’s conversational style and robust scholarship. By encouraging sociological thinking about contemporary families, The Family helps students become savvy consumers of media-reported research. In the Second Edition, Cohen examines trends in family life such as gender fluidity, sexuality in later life, and technology’s transformation of romantic relationships. The book is further strengthened by expanded media resources including award-winning InQuizitive activities.


Contents:

Preface

About the Author

Chapter 1. Moral Philosophy and Moral Reasoning • The Point of Moral Philosophy • Developing a Moral Outlook • Traditions of Moral Philosophy • The Nature of Moral Inquiry • Meta-Ethics • Normative Ethics • Applied Ethics • Moral Reasoning • Formal Logic: Validity, Soundness, Equivocation, Circularity • Analogy, Induction, Argument to the Best Explanation • Thought Experiments and Moral Intuitions • Special Moral Arguments • The Plan of This Book • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 2. Cultural Relativism • The Variety of Moral Practices • Objectivism or Cultural Relativism? • Relativism and Pseudo-Relativism • Problems for Relativism • Modest Relativism • Genital Cutting and Cultural Relativism • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 3. Skepticism and Subjectivism • Moral Nihilism • Morality and Custom • Morality as a Device to Curb the Strong • Individual Subjectivism • Expressivism • Objective Moral Concepts • Ethics, Language, Metaphysics, and Epistemology • The Argument From Queerness • Responding to Nihilism, Subjectivism, and Error Theory • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 4. Free Will and Moral Responsibility • Free Will • Intuitive Belief in Free Will • Sociological Determinism • Psychological and Physical Determinism • Determinism and Moral Responsibility • Compatibilism • Law and Determinism • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 5. Religion and Natural Law • Religion as a Basis for Morality • Divine Command and the Euthyphro Dilemma • Responding to the Dilemma • The Logic of the Dilemma • Religion and Natural Law • Natural Law and Reason • The Fact/Value Distinction • Natural Law and Conscience • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 6. Egoism • Why Be Moral? • Psychological Egoism • The Evidence for Psychological Egoism • Can Psychological Egoism Be Rejected? • Self-Interest and Evolution • Selfish Genes and Kin Altruism • The Mountain People • Ethical Egoism • Private Vices, Public Virtues • Pure Ethical Egoism • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 7. The Social Contract • Morality as a Compromise Agreement • The Social Contract • The Prisoner’s Dilemma • Cooperation and Public Goods • Developing the Contract Argument • Beyond Rules and Regulations • Social Contract Theory in Practice • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 8. Utilitarianism: Bentham and Mill • The Context of Bentham’s Moral Philosophy • Elimination of Asceticism • Elimination of the Principle of Sympathy and Antipathy • Clarifying Utilitarianism • Bentham’s Theory of the Good • Measuring Happiness • Utilitarianism and Equality for Women • The Subjection of Women • Justifying Utilitarianism • Mill’s “Proof” • Aggregating Happiness • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 9. Challenges for Utilitarianism • Is Happiness the Sole Ultimate Good? • The Narrowness Objection • The Agency Objection • The Evil Pleasures Objection • The Quality Objection • The Irrelevance Objection • Maximizing Happiness • Counterintuitive Consequences • Modifying Utilitarianism • Act and Rule Utilitarianism • Two-Level Utilitarianism • The Problem of Contingency: Gender and Race • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 10. Deontology: Kant • The Supreme Moral Principle • Summary of Kant’s Ethics • The Good Will • Sympathy • The Categorical Imperative • Hypothetical and Categorical Imperatives • The Maxim of an Action • Kant’s Examples • Suicide • False Promising, Neglecting Your Talents, and Failing to Help • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 11. Challenges for Kantian Ethics • Formulations of the Supreme Principle of Morality • The Formula of the Kingdom of Ends • The Formula of Humanity • Autonomy and Heteronomy • Using Kant’s Theory • Once More: Kant on Lying • Kantian Ethics in Real Life • Freedom and Morality • Kant and Christianity • Moral Principles, Race, and Gender • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 12. Virtue Ethics: Aristotle • Aristotle’s Moral Methodology • The Good Life • Acquiring Virtue • Is Virtue Natural? • Can Virtue Be Learned from a Book? • Habituation • Virtue, Vice, and the Golden Mean • The Virtues • The Golden Mean • Virtue Theory and the Mean • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 13. Challenges for Virtue Ethics • Criticisms of Virtue Ethics • Virtue Theory and Abortion • Do You Have a Character? • Aristotle on Gender and Race • Chapter Review • Summary • Discussion Questions • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 14. The Ethics of Gender and Race • Gender and Race: A Review • The Ethics of Care • Jake and Amy • Power, Privilege, Diversity • The Birdcage • Feminism and Science • Morality and Power • Critique of Moral Philosophy • Beyond the Binary Divide • The Ethics of Race • Taking Action • Chapter Review • Summary • Key Terms • Key Thinkers • Further Reading

Chapter 15. Developing a Moral Outlook • Moral Theories • Learning from Moral Philosophy

Key Thinkers

Glossary

Index


About the Author:

Jonathan Wolff is the Blavatnik Professor of Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford. Previously he was Professor of Philosophy, and Dean of Arts and Humanities at University College London. His books include An Introduction to Political Philosophy (1996, 3rd ed. 2016), Why Read Marx Today? (2002), Ethics and Public Policy (2011), and The Human Right to Health (Norton, 2012). He has been a member of the Nuffield Council of Bioethics, and worked on questions of the ethics of risk with the railway and pharmaceutical industries in the UK, as well as the government. He writes a regular column for the Guardian newspaper.


Target Audience:

Students and academicians of Philosophy.

 

 
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