Title Treating Depression, Anxiety, and Stress in Ethnic and Racial Groups
Subtitle Cognitive Behavioral Approaches
Author Edward C. Chang, Christina A. Downey, Jameson K. Hirsch, Elizabeth A. Yu
ISBN 9781433829215
List price USD 79.95
Price outside India Available on Request
Original price
Binding Hardbound
No of pages 360
Book size 178 x 254 mm
Publishing year 2018
Original publisher American Psychological Association (Eurospan Group)
Published in India by .
Exclusive distributors Viva Books Private Limited
Sales territory India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, .
Status New Arrival
About the book Send Enquiry
  
 

Reviews:

“This excellent and much-needed contribution to the psychotherapy field provides a rich overview of research regarding each of the ethnic minority groups identified, along with important information for enhancing therapists’ effectiveness, and practical techniques and strategies for multicultural practice. I highly recommend it!”

—Pamela A. Hays, PhD, author of Addressing Cultural Complexities in Practice

 

“Edited by some of the foremost experts in the field, this volume covers cognitive behavioral models, measures, and treatment for depressive, anxiety, and stress disorders in the major racial and ethnic groups. Each chapter examines its subject in impressive breadth and depth. “

—Stefan G. Hofmann, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Boston University, Boston, MA

 

“This long overdue volume advances our understanding of the intersection of self-defined racial or ethnic identity and cultural context with cognitive behavioral approaches for common mental health concerns. It offers a comprehensive review of available research along with the limitations of the existing knowledge base. Thought-provoking questions will spur further work in support of culturally responsive assessments, treatments, and research. “

—Ann Marie Yamada, PhD, coeditor of the Handbook of Multicultural Mental Health

Description:

Depression, anxiety, and stress are responsible for an overwhelming number of mental health care visits, and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) offers the most popular, empirically supported approach to treating these conditions. Yet little is known about the effectiveness of CBT with African American, Latino, Asian American, and Native American populations – ethnic and racial groups that make up nearly half the population of the United States.

This volume shows therapists how to adapt cognitive behavioral treatments for use with racial and ethnic minority clients. Contributors demonstrate how a client particular sociocultural background contextualizes her experience and understanding of mental health issues. They examine the influence of sociocultural context on experiences of social anxiety among Asian-Americans, the role of racial identity in the way stress and anxiety are experienced by African-American clients, and much more. They propose adaptations of standard CBT treatments to maximize their effectiveness for all clients, regardless of race or ethnicity.

Contents:

Contributors

Series Foreword Frederick T. L. Leong

Foreword Gayle Y. Iwamasa

Preface

Introduction: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments in Ethnoracial Groups
Edward C. Chang, Christina A. Downey, Jameson K. Hirsch, and Elizabeth A. Yu

Part I. Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Depressive Disorders

Chapter 1: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Depressive Disorders in Asian Americans
Wei-Chin Hwang, Leslie C. Ho, Courtney P. Chan, and Kristyne K. Hong

Chapter 2: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Depressive Disorders in Latin Americans
Victoria K. Ngo and Jeanne Miranda

Chapter 3: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Depressive Disorders in African Americans
Enrique W. Neblett, Jr., Effua E. Sosoo, Henry A. Willis, Donte L. Bernard, and Jiwoon Bae

Chapter 4: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Depressive Disorders in American Indians
J. Douglas McDonald, Royleen Ross, Tess Kilwein, and Emily Sargent

Part II. Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Anxiety Disorders

Chapter 5: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Anxiety Disorders in Asian Americans
Janie J. Hong

Chapter 6: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Anxiety Disorders in Latinos: A Systematic Review
Guillermo Bernal, Cristina Adames, Kelvin Mariani, and Jeralys Morales

Chapter 7: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Anxiety Disorders in African Americans
Michele M. Carter and Tracy Sbrocco

Chapter 8: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Anxiety Disorders in American Indians and Alaska Natives
John McCullagh and Jacqueline S. Gray

Part III. Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Stress Disorders

Chapter 9: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Stress Disorders in Asian Americans
Joyce Chu, Holly Batchelder, and Gabrielle Poon

Chapter 10: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Stress Disorders in Latinos
Esteban V. Cardemil, Lisa M. Edwards, Tamara Nelson, and Karina T. Loyo

Chapter 11: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Stress Disorders in African Americans
Tawanda M. Greer, Elizabeth Brondolo, Elom Amuzu, and Amandeep Kaur

Chapter 12: Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments for Stress Disorders in American Indians and Alaska Natives
Beth Boyd and Ryan Hunsaker

Part IV. Where We Are and What We Need to Do

Chapter 13: Developing an Inclusive Path for Applying Cognitive Behavioral Models, Measures, and Treatments to Everyone
Christina A. Downey, Edward C. Chang, Jameson K. Hirsch, and Elizabeth A. Yu

Index

About the Editors

About the Editors:

Edward C. Chang, PhD, is a professor of psychology and social work and a faculty associate in Asian/Pacific Islander American Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

He received his BA in psychology and philosophy from the State University of New York at Buffalo and his MA and PhD degrees from the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Dr. Chang completed his APA-accredited clinical internship at Bellevue Hospital Center–New York University Medical Center.

He serves as a program evaluator for the Michigan Department of Community Health–Social Determinants of Health, working with the Asian Center of Southeast Michigan.

Dr. Chang also serves as an associate editor of Cognitive Therapy and Research. He has published nearly 200 empirical and scholarly works focusing on optimism and pessimism, perfectionism, loneliness, social problem solving, and cultural influences on behavior.

Christina A. Downey, PhD, is assistant vice-chancellor for academic affairs and student success and associate professor of psychology at Indiana University Kokomo.

She received her BA in psychology from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana, and her MS and PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Dr. Downey completed her APA-accredited clinical internship at the University of Michigan Center for the Child and Family and the University of Michigan Psychological Clinic.

Dr. Downey has published articles on various topics in journals such as Eating Behaviors, Psychology & Health, the Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, and The Journal of Effective Teaching and has published several chapters on positive psychology and its history. She also serves on the editorial board of Cognitive Therapy and Research.

She was coeditor of the Handbook of Race and Development in Mental Health (2012) with Edward C. Chang and Positive Psychology in Racial and Ethnic Groups: Theory, Research, and Practice (2016) with Edward C. Chang, Jameson K. Hirsch, and Natalie J. Lin.

Jameson K. Hirsch, PhD, is an associate professor and assistant chair of the Department of Psychology at East Tennessee State University.

He received his BS in psychology and MA in clinical psychology from East Tennessee State University and his PhD from the University of Wyoming.

Dr. Hirsch completed his APA-accredited clinical internship at State University of New York Upstate Medical University and his postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

He is on the editorial boards of Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, Journal of Rural Mental Health, International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, and Cognitive Therapy and Research.

Dr. Hirsch has made more than 300 presentations, published more than 100 articles, and coedited three books examining the role of sociocultural, cognitive–behavioral, and emotional characteristics, particularly protective factors, in psychological well-being and physical health.

Elizabeth A. Yu, MS, is a graduate student in the clinical science area in the Department of Psychology at the University of Michigan.

She received her BA and MS in psychology and is working toward her PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Ms. Yu has conducted, presented, and published research on a wide range of topics, including perfectionism, optimism and pessimism, hope, well-being, depression, suicide risk, and meaning in life. Key to her research interests is the consideration of culture and context, especially in ethnic minority populations.

Target Audience:

This book is intended for people interested in Mental Psychotherapy.

 

 
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