Title Grief and Loss Across the Lifespan, 3/e
Subtitle A Biopsychosocial Perspective
Author Judith L. M. McCoyd, Jeanne M. Koller, Carolyn Ambler Walter
ISBN 9780826149633
List price USD 85.00
Price outside India Available on Request
Original price
Binding Paperback
No of pages 348
Book size 178 x 254 mm
Publishing year 2021
Original publisher Springer Publishing Company
Published in India by .
Exclusive distributors Viva Books Private Limited
Sales territory Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka
Status New Arrival
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Description:

The third edition of this unrivaled text on loss, grief, and bereavement continues to provide a unique biopsychosocial perspective and developmental framework for understanding grieving patterns. Organized by a lifespan trajectory, this text describes developmental aspects of grieving, linking these theories to effective clinical work. Biopsychosocial developmental theories, including neurobiological and genetic information, frame chapters that include recent research on how people of that age respond to varied loss situations, and intervention strategies supported by practice experience and empirical evidence are addressed.

The new edition illuminates special considerations in risk and resilience for each life phase, systematically addressing issues of oppression, marginalization, and health disparities. It includes a new chapter on grief and loss as they effect individuals over 85 and covers spiritual development for each life phase. The book restructures the adult chapters to reflect major changes in theories on expanded lifespans, adds to content on evolving living arrangements for aging individuals, and expands coverage of common losses at different points in the lifespan. This new edition includes material on ageism and its impact on health and also examines the challenges faced by older adults in the LGBT community. Additionally, the third edition explicitly incorporates the rapidly evolving science of Adverse Childhood Experiences, addressing how ACEs intersect with grief and loss. Vignettes and case studies are incorporated into each life-phase chapter, illuminating the lived experience of grief. Thought-provoking discussion questions, chapter objectives, and additional resources for both students and instructors reinforce critical thinking and an Instructor’s Manual, Casebook (of prior chapter readings).

 

New to the Third Edition:

  • Adds Special Considerations in Risk and Resilience to every chapter
  • Incorporates Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES) and their effects at various life stages
  • Focus on neurobiological and genomic aspects of health
  • Includes a new chapter on the Fourth Age – from 85 up
  • Discusses spiritual development for each life phase
  • Incorporates new case studies
  • Restructures adult chapters to reflect major new theories about expanded lifespans
  • Welcomes a new author who adds content on the third and fourth ages of older adulthood, ageism, and the experience of aging in LGBT communities
  • Expands content on areas of marginalization – race, gender, financial resources, educational disparities, and more
  • Expands content on evolving living arrangements for older adults
  • Expands information on typical losses at different life stages

 

Key Features:

  • Provides a complete overview of classic and current grief theories
  • Delivers a standardized developmental approach to each age group for consistency
  • Presents practical intervention strategies for different life stages
  • Includes chapter objectives, vignettes, case studies, and narratives to illustrate specific forms of loss
  • Delivers abundant instructor resources including instructor’s guide with sample syllabus and exercises, PowerPoints, class activities, and suggested resources


Contents:

Preface

Acknowledgments

 

Chapter 1. Grief and Loss: Theories and Context • Introduction • Objectives • Context • Text Structure • Bio–Psycho–Social–Spiritual Aspects of Grief • Biological Effects of Grief • Psychological Effects of Grief • Social Aspects of Grief • Spiritual Aspects of Grief • Risk and Resilience and Grappling with Adverse Childhood Experiences • A Word About the Changing Demographic of the United States and the World • Introduction to Grief Theory • Classical Grief Theory • Task-Based Theories • Stage-Based Theories • The Transition to Postmodern Grief Theory • Dual-Process Model • Revision of the Assumptive World or Relearning the World • Meaning-Making and Grief • Continuing Bonds and Grief • Disenfranchised Grief • Ambiguous and Nonfinite (or Chronic) Grief • Issues of Intervention • Therapist Activity When Intervening With Grief • Mindfulness as an Intervention for Grief • A Final Word About Grief Work • Discussion Questions

Chapter 2. Grief and Loss in the Context of Perinatal Attachment and Loss • Introduction • Objectives • Vignette • Developmental Aspects of Pregnancy • Biological Developmental Context of Pregnancy • Psychological Aspects of Pregnancy • Social Aspects of Pregnancy • Special Considerations in Risk and Resilience • Summary of Development in the Prenatal Period • Loss as Experienced by a Fetus • Reactions of Others to the Loss of a Fetus • Biological Changes Associated With Intrauterine Fetal Death • Psychological Aspects of Intrauterine Fetal Death • Social Aspects of Intrauterine Fetal Death • Other Types of Perinatal Loss • Infertility • Losses Related to Unintended Pregnancy • Assisted Reproductive Technologies • Medically Complicated Pregnancies and Loss • Prenatal Diagnosis and Termination of Pregnancy for Fetal Anomaly • Delivery of a Premature or Medically Compromised Neonate • Intervention • Readings • Daniella and Her Family’s Challenging Beginnings by Heather Douglas • Jasper’s Birth: Accumulated Losses and Elation by Emily Zimmerman-Levitt • Releasing Rosie: A Case of Pediatric Hospice by Karie McGuire • Summary • Discussion Questions

Chapter 3. Grief and Loss in Infancy, Toddlerhood, and Preschool • Introduction • Objectives • Vignette • Developmental Tasks: Trust Versus Mistrust and Autonomy Versus Shame • Biological Development • Psychological Development • Social Development • Spiritual Development • Special Considerations in Risk and Resilience • Losses Experienced in Infancy and Early Childhood • Death of a Caregiver or Loved One • Living Losses: Atypical, Typical, and Maturational Losses • Loss of Caregiving • Loss of a Child’s Own Health • Birth and Gradual Loss of Complete Care • Birth of a Sibling • Reactions of Parents and Others to the Loss of an Infant or Preschooler • Loss of the Idealized Child • Death of an Infant, Toddler, or Preschooler • Interventions • Readings • Latrice’s Story by Colleen Martinez • Hannah’s Story by Maya Doyle and Carrie Ostrea • Summary • Discussion Questions

Chapter 4. Grief and Loss in Elementary School-Age Children • Introduction • Objectives • Vignette • Developmental Tasks: Initiative Versus Guilt and Industry Versus Inferiority • Biological Development • Psychological Development • Social Development • Spiritual Development • Special Considerations in Risk and Resilience • Loss Experienced by Elementary School-Age Children • Impacts and Perceptions of Loss for Elementary School-Age Children • Death Losses • Death of a Parent • Death of a Sibling • Death of a Pet • Living Losses: Atypical, Typical, and Maturational Losses • Losses of a Parent(s) Due to Abuse • Loss Due to Parental Divorce • Loss of Being a Child • Loss Due to Illness or Injury • Reactions of Others to the Loss of an Elementary School-Age Child • Parents’ Loss of a Child • Forgotten Mourners—The Grandparents • Losses (Nondeath) Related to Child Protective Services • Intervention Issues with Children in Elementary School • Readings • Good Boys of Divorced Parents—Part I: Childhood Differences by Stephen Sidorsky • Fun and Fall Affect the Future: Childhood Injury’s Unseen Losses by Caitlin McCarthy • Matty’s Death and Emmy’s Life With Li-Fraumeni Syndrome by Allison Werner-Lin and Catherine Wilsnack • Summary • Discussion Questions

Chapter 5. Grief and Loss in Tweens and Teens • Introduction • Objectives • Vignette • Developmental Tasks: Identity Development Versus Identity Diffusion • Biological Development • Psychosocial Development • Spiritual Development • Special Considerations in Risk and Resilience • Losses Experienced by the Adolescent • Death Losses • Death of a Parent • Death of a Sibling • Death of a Grandparent • Death of a Friend • Living Losses: Atypical, Typical, and Maturational Losses • Loss of Health • Loss of Self-Esteem/Identity • Loss of a Relationship • Higher Expectations for Responsibility and Independence • Aspects of Identity Change • Reactions of Others to the Death of an Adolescent • Parents’ Loss of a Tween or Teen • Grandparents’ Grief After Adolescent’s Death • Interventions With Tweens and Teens • Learn to BREATHE and Grief-Help Programs • Readings • Losing a Mother: Augusta’s Grief by Erica Goldblatt Hyatt • Helping Bridget Feel Safe Again: Surviving Sexual Abuse by Elaine Shor • Summary • Discussion Questions

Chapter 6. Grief and Loss in Emerging Adults • Introduction • Objectives • Vignette • Developmental Tasks: Adult Sufficiency or Insufficiency • Biological Development • Psychological Development • Social Development • Spiritual Development • Special Considerations in Risk and Resilience • Losses Experienced by Emerging Adults • Death Losses • Death of a Parent • Death of Friends/Lovers • Suicide Deaths • Living Losses: Atypical, Typical, and Maturational Losses • Chronic and Life-Threatening Illness • Climate Grief • Loss of Self-Esteem • Loss of Economic Viability • Loss of a Romantic Relationship • Losses Related to Substance Use Disorders • Reactions of Others to the Death of an Emerging Adult • Parents’ and Others’ Responses to an Emerging Adult’s Death • Interventions • Readings • There’s No One to Call by Elizabeth Wolf • Helicopter Parenting During Emerging Adulthood and the Loss of Grit by Deborah Dumont • Transitions to Adulthood for Individuals With Developmental Disabilities by Bonnie Fader Wilkenfeld • Summary • Discussion Questions

Chapter 7. Grief and Loss in Young Adulthood • Introduction • Objectives • Vignette • Defining Young Adulthood • Developmental Themes of Young Adulthood • Biological Development • Psychological Development • Social Development • Spiritual Development • Special Considerations in Risk and Resilience • Adverse Childhood Experiences • Racial and Ethnic Inequality and Home Ownership • Educational Level • Losses Experienced by Young Adults • Death Losses • Off-Time Losses and Unexpected Deaths of Loved Ones • Death of a Parent • Death of a Sibling • Death of a Significant Other (e.g., Spouse and Life Partner) • Death of a Close Friend • Living Losses: Atypical, Typical, and Maturational Losses • Loss of the Ability to Pursue the “American Dream” • Loss of the Probability of Having Children (Biologically) Due to Delay of Parenthood • Losses Connected With Becoming Parents • Losses Due to Parental Divorce • Parental Divorce Experienced in Young Adult’s Childhood • Parental Divorce Experienced in Young Adulthood • Losses Due to Young Adults’ Divorce • Losses Due to Military Service, Including Disability and Trauma • Reactions of Others to the Death of a Young Adult • Interventions • Gottman Method Couples Therapy • Complicated Grief Therapy • Readings • Sheila’s Loss of Self by Esther Ganz • Blaming Oneself for Heartbreak: A Case of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome by Joelle Zabotka • Summary • Discussion Questions

Chapter 8. Grief and Loss in Middle Adulthood • Introduction • Objectives • Vignette • Defining Middle Adulthood • Developmental • Themes of Middle Adulthood • Biological Development • Psychological Development • Social Development • Spiritual Development • Special Considerations in Risk and Resilience • Losses Experienced by Midlife Adults • Death Losses • Death of a Parent • Death of a Child • Death of a Sibling • Living Losses: Atypical, Typical, and Maturational Losses • Parental Decline in Physical and/or Cognitive Health • Care of a Child With Challenges • Divorce (Or the Breakup of Relationships Comparable With Marriage) • Loss of Work and/or Career Transitions • Loss of Health Onset or Increase of Chronic Health Conditions • Losses Related to an Adult Child’s Life Trajectory • Loss of the Family Home—“Downsizing” • Loss of One’s Dreams • Reactions of Others to the Death of an Adult in Midlife • Death of a Significant Other • Death of a Close Friend • Death of the Middle-Aged Adult Due to Suicide • Interventions • Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy and Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Programs • Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer’s Caregiver Health II • Readings • Becoming a Survivor by Delicate Flower • Losing Health While Staying Engaged by Anonymous • John’s Story: Healing After Cumulative Losses by Scott Pontier • Summary • Discussion Questions

Chapter 9. Grief and Loss in Retirement and Reinvention • Introduction • Objectives • Vignette • Developmental Aspects of Retirement: Preparing • Cultural Aspects of Retirement • Structural and Policy Forces Affecting Retirement Preparation • Special Considerations in Risk and Resilience • Theories Explaining Successful Transition to Retirement • Fantasy Versus Reality • Living Losses Linked to Retirement • Loss of Structured Time • Losses Related to Identity • Loss of Financial Flexibility • Loss of Work Colleagues • Losses in Cognition • Changes in Spousal and Other Significant Relationships • Housing Decisions • Reinvention • Interventions • Readings • Good Boys of Divorced Parents—Part II: Aftereffects by Stephen Sidorsky • Ella’s Retirement by Robin Wiley • My Retirement/Reinvention Story: How I Tried to Buffer My Losses by Carolyn Ambler Walter • Summary • Discussion Questions

Chapter 10. Grief and Loss in Young-Old Adulthood: The Third Age • Introduction • Objectives • Vignette • Defining Older Adulthood • Developmental Themes of Older Adulthood, Ages 65 to 84 • Biological Development • Psychological Development • Social Development • Spiritual Development • Special Considerations in Risk and Resilience • Losses Experienced by Older Adults in Their Third Age • Death Losses • Death of a Spouse/Life Partner • Death by Suicide • Death of an Adult Child • Death of Contemporaries • Living Losses: Atypical, Typical, and Maturational Losses • Social and Physical Changes • Loneliness and Social Isolation • Coping With Illness and Disability • Losses Related to Life-Threatening Illness • Reaction of Others to the Death of Third Agers • Adult Children • Interventions • Dual-Process Bereavement Group Intervention for Widowed Older Adults • Meaning in Loss Group • Readings • Ginny and Karen: Aging Together by
Carolyn A. Bradley • Saying “Yes, We Can Do That!” What Is It Like to Be a Hospice Nurse? by Carol Wallinger • Summary • Discussion Questions

Chapter 11. Grief and Loss in Older Adulthood: The Fourth Age • Introduction • Objectives • Vignettes • Defining Older Adulthood: The Fourth Age • Developmental Themes of the Oldest Old Age • Biological Development • Psychological Development • Social Development • Spiritual Development • Special Considerations in Risk and Resilience • Losses Experienced by Older Adults in Their Fourth Age • Death Losses • Death of a Spouse/Life Partner • Death by Suicide • Living Losses: Atypical, Typical, and Maturational Losses • Loss of Physical and/or Cognitive Health • Loss of Driving • Loss of Home/Need to Move/Homelessness • Reaction of Others to the Death of an Older Adult • Interventions • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy • Life Review Therapy and Reminiscence Therapy • A Matter of Balance: A Falls Prevention Program • Animal-Assisted Therapy and Animal-Assisted Activities • Readings • Untouchable Loss: Marion’s Story of Her Missing Self-Esteem by Lauren Snedeker • An Expression of Loss and Coping in the Aged Adult by Mary Kay Krowkowski • Summary • Discussion Questions

Chapter 12. Conclusions • Introduction • Objectives • Endings • Accompanying the Bereaved in Their Grief • Maturational Losses as Disenfranchised Losses • Importance of the Dual-Process Model of Coping With Bereavement • Importance of Continuing Bonds • Meaning-Making as a Process of Growth • Trauma and Grief • Grief Counseling Efficacy • Grief and the Clinician: Cautions • You Cannot Bypass Grief • Take Care of Yourself • Discussion Questions

 

Index


About the Authors:

Judith L. M. McCoyd, PhD, LCSW, QCSW, is an Associate Professor at Rutgers University—School of Social Work, teaching in the MSW advanced clinical curriculum and working with both the PhD in Social Work and DSW doctoral programs. Before academia, she worked in perinatal, emergency room, and oncology settings and she continues to maintain a small private practice with perinatal and end-of-life care as specialties. She is coauthor of Grief and Loss Across the Lifespan: A Biopsychosocial Perspective (all three editions) and coeditor (with Toba S. Kerson) of Social Work in Health Settings: Practice in Context (3rd & 4th eds.—2010, 2016). She presents at national and international conferences such as Council on Social Work Education, National Association of Perinatal Social Work, and the Society for Social Work and Research, and has journal publications about perinatal complications and loss, genetic testing and decision making, technology and health care, societal aspects of bereavement, and social work education. Her current research explores how perinatal technologies affect the experience of childbearing and bereavement.

Jeanne M. Koller, PhD, MSW, LCSW, is an Assistant Professor at Monmouth University School of Social Work, primarily teaching in the graduate clinical curriculum. She previously was on faculty at the Rutgers School of Social Work. At Rutgers she served as Coordinator for the MSW Aging & Health Certificate. Over the years Dr. Koller taught courses related to aging and health, MSW foundation level courses, and undergraduate level courses. In addition to her work in academia, Koller had over 26 years of clinical social work practice experience specializing in grief and loss, depression, relational issues, aging, and issues related to the LGBT+ community. Dr. Koller is a member of the Board of Trustees for the Visiting Nurse Association of Central Jersey (VNACJ) Community Health Centers; the coordinator for the NJ Radical Age Chapter; the Co-Chair for the Monmouth/Ocean NASW Unit; and is on the Executive Committee of Garden State Equality’s “Elders for Equality.” Dr. Koller also serves on the American Society on Aging’s Editorial Board for the LGBT Aging Issues Network (LAIN) and regularly serves as an Abstract Reviewer for The Gerontological Society of America. She is an active presenter on issues pertaining to work with LGBT+ families, aging and the LGBT+ community, and ageism.

Carolyn Ambler Walter, PhD, LCSW, is a Professor Emerita at the Center for Social Work Education at Widener University, Chester, PA where she taught MSW and PhD students. Dr. Walter is the coauthor of Grief and Loss Across the Lifespan: A Biopsychosocial Perspective (2009) and the author of The Loss of a Life Partner: Narratives of the Bereaved (2003). She is the coauthor of Breast Cancer in the Life Course: Women’s Experiences and the author of The Timing of Motherhood. Dr. Walter has published many articles in professional journals on such topics as women’s issues, grief and loss and social work education. She has given presentations at state and regional hospice conferences throughout the US and at ADEC, NASW, and CSWE national conferences. She is currently serving as a consultant on grief, loss and transformation and life transitions. Her current interests involve teaching courses in Restoring Your Life after Loss to retirees older adult communities and volunteer organizations.


Target Audience:

This book is for counselors.

 

 
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