Title The Norton Introduction to Philosophy, 2/e
Subtitle
Author Gideon Rosen, Alex Byrne, Joshua Cohen, Elizabeth Harman, Seana Shiffrin
ISBN 9780393624427
List price USD 77.50
Price outside India Available on Request
Original price
Binding Paperback
No of pages 1312
Book size 153 x 235 mm
Publishing year 2018
Original publisher W. W. Norton & Company
Published in India by .
Exclusive distributors Viva Books Private Limited
Sales territory India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, .
Status New Arrival
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Description:

Philosophy made accessible for introductory students.

The Second Edition of this path-breaking collection gives students all the tools they need to understand and engage with major philosophical issues. Students are presented with clear yet thorough topic introductions, historical context, reading guides for challenging selections, and exclusive commissioned essays written by leading contemporary philosophers specifically for undergraduates. The Second Edition features a NEW co-author, a NEW focus on diversity within the field, and NEW readings and topics relevant to students’ lives.


Contents:

Preface

Acknowledgments

Getting Started

Why Philosophy? Five Views

A Brief Guide to Logic and Argumentation

Some Guidelines for Writing Philosophy Papers

 

Part I: Philosophy of Religion

Chapter 1: Does God Exist?

Anselm of Canterbury, The Ontological Argument, from Proslogion • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Anselm’s Ontological Argument • Notes and Questions

Thomas Aquinas, The Five Ways, from Summa Theologica • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Aquinas’s Cosmological Arguments • Notes and Questions

William Paley, The Argument from Design, from Natural Theology • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Roger White, The Argument from Cosmological Fine-Tuning • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Louise Antony, No Good Reason–Exploring the Problem of Evil • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Eleonore Stump, The Problem of Evil • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 2: Is It Reasonable to Believe without Evidence?

Blaise Pascal, The Wager, from Pensées • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Alan Hájek, Pascal’s Ultimate Gamble • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

W. K. Clifford, The Ethics of Belief • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

William James, The Will to Believe • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Alvin Plantinga, Is Belief in God Properly Basic? • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Lara Buchak, When Is Faith Rational? • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

 

Part II: Epistemology

Chapter 3: What Is Knowledge?

Plato, Meno • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Edmund Gettler, Is Justified True Belief Knowledge? • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Gettier’s Definition of Knowledge • Notes and Questions

Timothy Williamson, Knowledge and Belief • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 4: How Can We Know about What We Have Not Observed?

David Hume, Sceptical Doubts Concerning the Operations of the Understanding, Section IV, and Sceptical Solution of These Doubts, Section V, from An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Hume on Induction • Notes and Questions

P. F. Strawson, The “Justification” of Induction, from Introduction to Logical Theory • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Nelson Goodman, The New Riddle of Induction, from Fact, Fiction, and Forecast • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Goodman’s New Riddle of Induction • Notes and Questions

Gilbert Harman, The Inference to the Best Explanation • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 5: How Can You Know Your Own Mind or the Mind of Another Person?

Bertrand Russell, The Argument from Analogy, from Human Knowledge: Its Scope and Limits • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Saul Kripke, Wittgenstein and Other Minds, from Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Man Seen from the Outside, from The World of Perception • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

D. M. Armstrong, Introspection, from A Materialist Theory of the Mind • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Sarah K. Paul, John Doe and Richard Roe • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Alex Byrne, Skepticism about the Internal World • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 6: How Can We Know about the External World?

René Descartes, Meditation I: What Can Be Called into Doubt, from Meditations on First Philosophy • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Descartes’s Meditations • Notes and Questions

David Hume, Of Scepticism with Regard to the Senses, from A Treatise of Human Nature • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Hume on Skepticism • Notes and Questions

G. E. Moore, Proof of an External World • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Jonathan Vogel, Skepticism and Inference to the Best Explanation • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Rae Langton, Ignorance of Things in Themselves • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

 

Part III: Metaphysics and the Philosophy of Mind

Chapter 7: Is Mind Material?

René Descartes, Meditation II: The Nature of the Human Mind. and How It Is Better Known than the Body. and Meditation VI: ... The Real Distinction between Mind and Body, from Meditations on First Philosophy • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Elisabeth of Bohemia, Correspondence with Descartes • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Antoine Arnauld, Fourth Set of Objections • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Gilbert Ryle. Descartes’ Myth, from The Concept of Mind • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

J. J. C. Smart, Sensations and Brain Processes • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

John Searle, Can Computers Think?, from Minds, Brains, and Science • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 8: What Is Consciousness?

Thomas Nagel. What Is It like to Be a Bat? • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Frank Jackson, Epiphenomenal Oualia • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Jackson’s Knowledge Argument • Notes and Questions

Patricia Smith Churchland, Are Mental States Irreducible to Neurobiological States?, from Neurophilosophy: A Unified Science of the Mind/Brain • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

David Chalmers, The Hard Problem of Consciousness • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Michael Tye, The Puzzle of Transparency • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 9: Are Things as They Appear?

Bertrand Russell, Appearance and Reality, from The Problems of Philosophy • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

George Berkeley, Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Vasubandhu, Twenty Verses with Auto-Commentary • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Vasubandhu on Idealism • Notes and Questions

Nick Bostrom, Are We Living in a Computer Simulation? • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 10: What Is There?

Stephen Yablo, A Thing and Its Matter • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Peter Unger, There Are No Ordinary Things • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Gideon Rosen, Numbers and Other Immaterial Objects • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Penelope Maddy, Do Numbers Exist? • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

 

Part IV: From Metaphysics to Ethics

Chapter 11: What Is Personal Identity?

John Locke, Of Identity and Diversity, from An Essay Concerning Human Understanding • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Richard Swinburne, The Dualist Theory, from Personal Identity • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Derek Parfit, Personal Identity, from Reasons and Persons • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Bernard Williams, The Self and the Future • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 12: What Is Race? What Is Gender?

Anthony Appian, The Uncompleted Argument: Du Bois and the Illusion of Race • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Sally Haslanger, Gender and Race: (What) Are They? (What) Do We Want Them to Be? • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Quayshawn Spencer, Are Folk Races Like Dingoes, Dimes, or Dodos? Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Elizabeth Barnes, The Metaphysics of Gender • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 13: Do We Possess Free Will?

Galen Strawson, Free Will • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Roderick Chisholm, Human Freedom and the Self • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

A. J. Ayer, Freedom and Necessity • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

P. F. Strawson, Freedom and Resentment • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Strawson on Freedom and Resentment • Notes and Questions

Harry Frankfurt, Freedom of the Will and the Concept of a Person • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Susan Wolf, Sanity and the Metaphysics of Responsibility • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Nomy Arpaly, Why Moral Ignorance Is No Excuse • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

 

Part V: Ethics

Chapter 14: What Is the Right Thing to Do?

Peter Singer, Famine, Affluence, and Morality • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Onora O’neill, The Moral Perplexities of Famine and World Hunger • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Judith Jarvis Thomson, A Defense of Abortion • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Don Marquis, Why Abortion Is Immoral • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Elizabeth Harman, The Moral Significance of Animal Pain and Animal Death • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Cora Diamond, Eating Meat and Eating People • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 15: Do Your Intentions Matter?

G. E. M. Anscombe, Mr Truman’s Degree • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Thomas M. Scanlon, When Do Intentions Matter to Permissibility? • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Barbara Herman, Impermissibility and Wrongness • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Michele M. Moody-Adams, Culture, Responsibility, and Affected Ignorance • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Angela M. Smith, Implicit Bias, Moral Agency, and Moral Responsibility • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 16: Which Moral Theory Is Correct?

John Stuart Mill, Utilitarianism • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Immanuel Kant, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Kant’s Moral Theory • Notes and Questions

Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Rosalind Hursthouse, Virtue Ethics • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Friedrich Nietzsche, On the Genealogy of Morals, Beyond Good and Evil, and The Gay Science • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 17: Is Morality Objective?

J. L. Mackie, The Subjectivity of Values, from Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

R. Jay Wallace, Moral Subjectivism • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Thomas Nagel, Ethics, from The Last Word • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Philip L. Quinn, The Divine Command Theory • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Quinn’s Divine Intention Theory • Notes and Questions

Elizabeth Harman, Is It Reasonable to “Rely on Intuitions” in Ethics? • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Sharon Street, Does Anything Really Matter or Did We Just Evolve to Think So? • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Sarah McGrath, What Is Weird about Moral Deference? • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 18: Why Do What Is Right?

Plato, The Republic • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Judith Jarvis Thomson, Why Ought We Do What Is Right? • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

David Hume, Of the Passions, and Of Morals, from A Treatise of Human Nature; Why Utility Pleases, from An Enquiry Concerning, the Principles of Morals • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Hume on Moral Motivation • Notes and Questions

Immanuel Kant, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Kant on Moral Motivation • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 19: What Is the Meaning of Life?

Richard Taylor, The Meaning of life • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Susan Wolf, Meaning in life and Why It Matters • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Thomas Nagel, The Absurd • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Samuel Scheffler, Death and the Afterlife • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

 

Part VI: Political Philosophy

Chapter 20: How Can the State Be Justified?

Aristotle, Politics • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Hobbes’s State of Nature • Notes and Questions

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, The Social Contract • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Rousseau’s Solution to the Fundamental Problem • Notes and Questions

A. John Simmons, Rights-Based Justifications for the State • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Charles Mills, The Racial Contract • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 21: What Is the Value of Liberty?

John Locke, A Letter Concerning Toleration • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

John Stuart Mill, On liberty • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Mill on Liberty • Notes and Questions

Patrick Devlin, Morals and the Criminal Law • Test Your Understanding • Reader’s Guide: Devlin on Enforcing Morals • Notes and Questions

Amartya Sen, Elements of a Theory of Human Rights • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Chapter 22: Does Justice Require Equality?

John Rawls, Two Principles of Justice. from A Theory of Justice • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Harry Frankfurt, Equality as a Moral Ideal • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Martha Nussbaum, Political Equality • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Robert Nozick, Distributive Justice. from Anarchy, State. and Utopia • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Susan Moller Okin, Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women? • Test Your Understanding • Notes and Questions

Analyzing the Arguments

Answers to Test Your Understanding

Glossary

Credits

Name Index


About the Authors:

Gideon Rosen is Stuart Professor of Philosophy at Princeton University. He is the author (with John P. Burgess) of A Subject With No Object (1997) and numerous essays in metaphysics, moral philosophy, and the philosophy of mathematics.

Alex Byrne is Professor of Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is co-editor, with David R. Hilbert, of Readings on Color, vols. 1 and 2 (1997) and, with Heather Logue, Disjunctivism (2008). He is currently completing a book on self-knowledge.

Joshua Cohen is a faculty member at Apple University, and has taught at MIT (1977-2006) and Stanford (2006-2014). He is the author, co-author, or editor of more than 25 books. His most recent books are Philosophy, Politics, Democracy (2009); The Arc of the Moral Universe (2011); and Rousseau: A Free Community of Equals (2012). Since 1991, Cohen has been editor of Boston Review.

Elizabeth Harman is Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Philosophy and Human Values at Princeton University. She is the author of “Morally Permissible Moral Mistakes” (Ethics), “The Irrelevance of Moral Uncertainty” (Oxford Studies in Metaethics), “Creation Ethics: The Moral Status of Early Fetuses and the Ethics of Abortion” (Philosophy and Public Affairs), and other essays in moral philosophy.

Seana Valentine Shiffrin is Professor of Philosophy and Pete Kameron Professor of Law and Social Justice at UCLA. She is the author of Speech Matters: On Lying, Morality, and the Law (2014), an associate editor of Philosophy and Public Affairs, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


Target Audience:

This book is designed for undergraduates and introductory courses in philosophy and as a resource for readers approaching the subject for the first time.

 

 
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