Title Realizing the Full Potential of Social Safety Nets in Africa
Subtitle
Author Kathleen Beegle, Aline Coudouel, Emma Monsalve
ISBN 9781464811647
List price USD 35.00
Price outside India Available on Request
Original price
Binding Paperback
No of pages 422
Book size 152 x 228 mm
Publishing year 2018
Original publisher The World Bank
Published in India by .
Exclusive distributors Viva Books Private Limited
Sales territory India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Nepal, .
Status New Arrival
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Description:

Poverty has been declining in Sub-Saharan Africa, but millions are still poor or vulnerable. To address this ongoing and complex problem, all countries in the region have now deployed social safety net programs as part of their core development plans. The number of programs has skyrocketed since the mid-2000s, although many interventions are still modest in size. This notable shift in social policy reflects an embrace of the role that social safety nets can play in the fight against poverty and vulnerability, and more generally in building human capital and spurring economic growth. Realizing the Full Potential of Social Safety Nets in Africa provides evidence that positive impacts on equity, resilience, and opportunity are growing, and it is clear that these programs can be good investments.

For the potential of social safety nets to be realized, however, they need to expand with smart technical and design choices. Beyond technical considerations and at least as important, this book argues that a series of decisive shifts needs to occur in three critical spheres: political, institutional, and financial:

  • First, to recognize the role of politics in offering opportunities for expansion and in guiding design and program choice;
  • Second, to anchor safety net programs in strong institutional arrangements that facilitate their expansion and sustainability;
  • And third, to build sustainable financing through greater efficiency, more varied and predictable resources, and shock-responsive resources.

Ignoring these spheres may lead to technically sound, but practically impossible, choices and designs. A deliberate focus on these areas is essential if social safety nets are to be brought to scale and sustained at scale. Only then will their full potential and their contribution to the fight against poverty and vulnerability be realized.


Contents:

Foreword

Foreword

Acknowledgments

About the Authors and Contributors

Abbreviations

Overview: Realizing the Full Potential of Social Safety Nets in Africa • Reaching the Poor and Vulnerable in Africa through Social Safety Nets (Chapter 1) • Social Safety Nets Promote Poverty Reduction, Increase Resilience, and Expand Opportunities (Chapter 2) • Recognizing and Leveraging Politics to Expand and Sustain Social Safety Nets (Chapter 3) • Anchoring in Strong Institutions to Expand and Sustain Social Safety Nets (Chapter 4) • Harnessing Resources to Expand and Sustain Social Safety Nets (Chapter 5) • The Road Ahead for Bringing Social Safety Nets to Scale in Africa • References

Introduction

Chapter 1: Reaching the Poor and Vulnerable in Africa through Social Safety Nets • Despite Improvements, Poverty and Vulnerability to Shocks Are Widespread • Social Safety Nets Have Been Expanding Rapidly in Africa • The Design of Social Safety Nets Varies across Africa • Social Safety Nets Are Evolving • Social Safety Nets Are Reaching Some, but Many of the Poor Are Not Covered • Some Countries Spend Heavily, but Programs Need to Be Brought to Scale and Sustained • Notes • References

Chapter 2: Social Safety Nets Promote Poverty Reduction, Increase Resilience, and Expand Opportunities • Social Safety Nets Improve Equity • Building Resilience through Social Safety Nets • Increasing Opportunities through Social Safety Nets • Bringing Social Safety Nets to Scale • Annex 2A: Programs Included in the Meta-analysis • Annex 2B: Meta-analysis Methodology • Annex 2C: Partial and General Equilibrium Methodology • Notes • References

Chapter 3: Recognizing and Leveraging Politics to Expand and Sustain Social Safety Nets • The Political Appetite for Adopting and Expanding Social Safety Nets • Program Parameters Are Political • Political Impacts May Favor Social Safety Net Sustainability • Notes • References

Chapter 4: Anchoring in Strong Institutions to Expand and Sustain Social Safety Nets • From Frameworks to Commitments: Emerging National Strategies for Social Safety Nets • Rooting Social Safety Nets in Organizations for Policy Setting, Oversight, Coordination, and Management • Ensuring That Organizations Can Effectively Implement Social Safety Net Programs • Creating Incentives to Encourage Individual Actors to Deliver Results • Notes • References

Chapter 5: Harnessing Resources to Expand and Sustain Social Safety Nets • Spending and Financing for Social Safety Nets: A Snapshot • Making Better Use of Existing Resources • Securing Sustainable Resources to Expand and Sustain Coverage • Developing a Financing Strategy for a Reliable, Effective Emergency Response • Notes • References

Appendixes

A: Definitions and Data Sources • A.1 Definition of Social Safety Nets • A.2 Typologies Used in This Report • Table A.1 List of Countries and Country Groups • A.3 Data Sources • Table A.2 Household Surveys Used

B: Estimating the Number of Programs, the Number of Beneficiaries, Coverage, and Spending • B.1 Methodology to Estimate the Number of Programs • B.2 Methodology to Estimate the Number of Beneficiaries • B.3 Methodology to Estimate Coverage Rates • B.4 Methodology to Estimate Spending on Social Safety Nets

C: The Country Context • Table C.1 Main Indicators, by Country

D: Social Safety Net Institutions and Systems • Table D.1 Social Protection Policies and Strategies, by Country • Table D.2 Social Registries, by Country • Table D.3 Organizational Homes of Selected Social Safety Net Programs

E: Typologies of Social Safety Net Programs • Table E.1 Number of Social Safety Net Programs, by Program Typology and Country • Table E.2 Number of Social Safety Net Programs, by Program Typology and Country Group • Table E.3 Distribution of Social Safety Net Programs, by Program Typology and Country Group

F: Coverage of Social Safety Net Programs • Table F.1 Coverage of Social Safety Nets, by Program Typology and Country • Table F.2 Coverage of Social Safety Nets, by Program Typology and Country Group

G: Spending on Social Safety Net Programs • Table G.1 Spending on Social Safety Nets and Other Sectors, Tax Revenue, and Humanitarian Assistance, by Country • Table G.2 Spending on Social Safety Nets, by Program Typology and Country • Table G.3 Spending on Social Safety Nets, by Program Typology and Country Group • Table G.4 Distribution of Spending on Social Safety Nets, by Program Typology and Country • Table G.5 Distribution of Spending on Social Safety Nets, by Program Typology and Country Group • Table G.6 Distribution of Social Safety Net Spending Aggregated within Country Groups • Table G.7 Distribution of Spending on Social Safety Nets, by Population Quintile • Table G.8 Share of Development Partner Financing, Selected Programs • Table G.9 Administrative Costs for Selected Programs

H: Main Social Safety Net Programs, by Program Type • Table H.1 The Five Largest Programs of Each Type, Ranked by Number of Beneficiaries • Table H.2 The Five Largest Programs of Each Type, Ranked by Coverage as a Share of the Population

I: Generosity of Social Safety Net Programs • Table I.1 Generosity of Selected Cash Transfer Programs • Table I.2 Generosity of Selected Public Works Programs • Table I.3 Generosity of Selected Social Pensions

J: Tax Revenue • Table J.1 Tax Revenue, by Type of Revenue and Country • Table J.2 Tax Revenue, by Type and Country Group


About the Editors:

Kathleen Beegle is a Lead Economist with the World Bank Gender Group, joining in 2018. She was previously a Human Development Program Leader for Ghana, Liberia, and Sierra Leone, based in Accra, Ghana. Her research experience includes the study of poverty, labor, economic shocks, and methodological studies on household survey data collection in developing countries. She has expertise in the design and implementation of household surveys and their use for poverty and policy analysis. She recently co-lead the World Bank reports Realizing the Full Potential of Safety Nets in Africa and Poverty in A Rising Africa. Beegle was Deputy Director of the World Bank’s World Development Report 2013 on Jobs. She joined the Development Research Group of the World Bank in 2001, where she was a member of the Living Standards Measurement Study team. She received her Ph.D. in Economics from Michigan State University and competed a post-doctoral fellowship at RAND.

Emma Monsalve is a Social Protection Specialist (STC consultant) in the World Bank’s Social Protection and Labor Global Practice in Africa. She joined the Bank in 2014 and worked with the Social Protection and Labor Global Practice and the Poverty and Equity Global Practice in the LAC region. Before joining the Bank, she worked with the Inter-American Development Bank, and the Central Bank of Colombia. She has developed technical and analytical expertise in a wide array of human development topics, including social protection and labor, poverty, education and health. She has participated in several lending operations such as The Rwanda Strengthening Social Protection Project, the Honduras Additional Financing Social Protection Program, Bono 10 mil, and is currently task team member of the Social Protection and Skills Development Project in São Tomé and Príncipe. Complementary to her operational experience, she has led and participated in several Advisory Services and Analytics, Public Expenditure Reviews, Systematic Country Diagnostics (SCDs), the ASPIRE and the LAC Equity Lab (LEL) database and The Universal Basic Income Study. She holds an M.A. in Applied Economics from Johns Hopkins University and a B.A. in Economics from the University of Antioquia in Colombia.

Aline Coudouel is a Lead Economist with the World Bank, where she currently focuses on social assistance, social insurance, and labor markets in West Africa (especially Cabo Verde, Mauritania, and Senegal) after spending a few years working in Latin America and the Caribbean (Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Panama). Previously, she was part of the poverty team at the World Bank, working on debt relief and poverty reduction strategies and as a member of the team that defined and promoted the poverty and social impact analysis of policies. She was a coauthor of the flagship World Development Report 2012, on gender equality and development, which sought to explain the driving forces behind gender equality and its eff ect on economic growth and helped to enhance the understanding of the role of public action in promoting this important issue. Prior to joining the Bank, she worked as a researcher for the United Nations Children’s Fund, where she focused on the welfare of children and women in Europe and Central Asia. Aline holds a PhD in Economics from the European University Institute in San Domenico di Fiesole, Italy.


Target Audience:

This book will be useful to people interested in poverty and economic growth in sub-saharan Africa, social policy and development strategy in Africa.

 
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